Chick Lit: Friend or Foe?

Chick Lit: Friend or Foe? I have been reflecting recently upon genre. The publishing industry says separating novels out into different sub-sections helps to sell books. Selling books is good; I know that. However, I can’t help but feel a little uncomfortable with the way novels by women are sub-categorised. The term Chick Lit has always bothered me. Perhaps this is because the word ‘Chick’ … Continue reading Chick Lit: Friend or Foe?

Preparing to Write: Background Stories

I have always told myself stories. It helps me fall asleep at night and segues seamlessly into dreams. These stories are the basis for my writing. To get to know characters better, I write their background. These background stories might never make it into my manuscript – I never intend them to, either. They are my preparation for creating full characters that make emotional sense. … Continue reading Preparing to Write: Background Stories

Writing Fiction: What Works For You?

Everyone is different. What I think works in fiction might have some overlap with what you think works in fiction but, equally, we will have areas where we disagree. Imagine a beautiful Venn diagram. (Imagine it because I don’t know how to create one here.) I am here to suggest, like Jack Palance in City Slickers, that you find what works for you in the … Continue reading Writing Fiction: What Works For You?

How to write a (fiction) synopsis

By popular* demand, this post is designed to help you write every author’s nightmare – the synopsis. It’s a necessary evil: agents, mentors, and publishers ask for a synopsis of your novel (usually along with a few chapters and a kick-ass cover letter) when you submit your novel for their consideration. It’s one of those terrible tasks which is both highly stressful and also intensely … Continue reading How to write a (fiction) synopsis

Managing the pace of your novel

Pacing is one of the hardest things about writing a novel. Whether you are a Pantser or a Planner, it can be difficult to manage the tension between making interesting events happen and giving your characters time to react. If you are going for highly unrealistic action adventures where characters get repeatedly punched in the face only to get up and sprint a mile, you … Continue reading Managing the pace of your novel